Clinician Benefits

Why it’s important to implement the new recommendations1

Debbie HicksMike Smith – Clinician Benefits

State of the art practice

All clinicians need to keep updated with state of the art clinical practice. The optimal practices in insulin delivery and safety from across the globe have been incorporated in the new FITTER recommendations which, offer all clinicians easy access to state of the art practice.

Evidence based practice

Clinical practice informed by sound evidence base is critical for ensuring optimal outcomes for patients. FITTER recommendations are based on contemporaneous evidence. Each recommendation is graded by the strength of evidence, enabling clinicians to determine the strength of the recommendation at a glance.

The panel used the following scale for the strength of each recommendation:

  1. Strongly recommended
  2. Recommended
  3. Unresolved issue

For grading the degree of scientific support for each recommendation, we used this scale:

  1. At least one rigorously performed study which is peer-reviewed and published (excludes observational studies)
  2. At least one observational, epidemiologic or population-based study
  3. Expert consensus opinion informed by broad patient experience

Lower clinical burden

A range of clinical case studies, health economic outcome research and clinicial trials have shown that optimal injection technique delivered to patients in a multi model fashion with both generalized and individualized (tailored) approach can improve both day to day and long term blood glucose control.1 Improvements in clinical outcome can be shown to reduce not only the burden of the disease on the individual but also on providers and wider society.1

Improve clinical outcomes

Reduced HbA1c

  • Reduced risk of long-term glycaemic related microvascular, macrovascular and neurovascular complication
  • Reduced need to refer to specialist care

Reduced risk of unexplained hypoglycaemia

  • Reduced ambulance cost
  • Reduced accident and emergency admissions
  • Reduced unplanned hospital admissions
  • Reduced primary care visits
  • Reduced need to refer to specialist care

Reduced risk of glycaemic variation

  • Reduced ambulance cost
  • Reduced accident and emergency admissions
  • Reduced unplanned hospital admissions
  • Reduced primary care visits
  • Reduced risk of long-term glycaemic microvascular, macrovascular and neurovascular complications
  • Reduced need to refer to specialist care

Reduced insulin use to achieve improved outcomes

  • Improved clinical outcomes
  • Reduced burden on healthcare system and providers
  • Lower overall cost

Clinician and Patient Safety

  • Safer working environments for patients and clinicians
  • Risk assessment and management
  • Better outcomes for all stake holders at lower overall cost

References

  • 1 Frid AH, Kreugel G, Grassi G, et al. New insulin delivery recommendations. Mayo Clin Proc. September 2016; 91(9):1231-1255.
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